GENDER SCHOOL AND SOCIETY AND INCLUSIVE SCHOOL BOOK PDF

GENDER, SCHOOL, SOCIETY AND INCLUSIVE SCHOOL B.Ed. II YEAR BOOK IN ENGLISH PDF


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LIST OF THE TOPICS WHICH ARE COVERED IN THE PDF BOOK IS:

UNIT I
INTRODUCTION TO GENDER, GENDER ROLES, AND DEVELOPMENT

1.1. Introduction
1.2. Objectives
1.3. Gender Concepts and Terminology
1.3.1. Definition of Gender
1.3.2. Difference between Gender and Sex
1.3.3. The concept of gender, sexuality, and Development
1.3.4. Gender Dynamics
1.3.5. Social Construction of Gender
1.4. Gender Roles
1.4.1. Types of Gender Roles
1.4.2. Gender Roles and Relationships Matrix
1.4.3. Gender-based division and Valuation of Work
1.4.4. Exploring Attitudes towards Gender

SUGGESTED READINGS
FAO. 1997. Gender: the key to sustainability and food security. SD Dimensions, May 1997
(available at www.fao.org/sd).
Howard, P. 2003. Women and plants, gender relations in biodiversity management and
conservation. London, ZED Books.
Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. 1977. Men and Women of the Corporation. New York: Basic
Books.
Lippa, Richard A. 2002. Gender, Nature, and Nurture. Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum.
Oakley, Ann. 1972. Sex, Gender, and Society. New York: Harper and Row.
Thorne, Barrie. 1993. Gender Play: Girls and Boys in School. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers
University Press.

UNIT II
GENDER AND SCHOOL

2.1. Introduction
2.2. Objectives
2.3. Gender Bias
2.3.1. Gender Bias in School Environment
2.3.2. Gender Bias in Dropouts
2.3.3. Gender Bias in Household responsibilities
2.3.4. Social attitudes towards Girl’s Education
2.3.5. The value accorded to Women’s Education
2.4. Issues related to Gender in School
2.4.1. Sexual Abuse
2.4.2. Sexual Harassment
2.4.3. Perception of safety at school, home and beyond
2.4.4. Adult and Non-Formal Education for Women’s development
2.4.5. Importance of vocational training and income generation for women
2.5. Gender Equality
2.5.1. Role of schools in reinforcing gender equality
2.5.2. Role of peers in reinforcing gender equality
2.5.3. Role of teachers in reinforcing gender equality
2.5.4. Role of curriculum and textbook in reinforcing gender equality

SUGGESTED READINGS
Annual Report: (2008). Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of
Education, India.
Chappell, C. (2003). “Researching Vocational Education and Training: Where to From
Here?” Journal of Vocational Education and Training, 55 (1), 21-32.
Gender Identity Tobin, K., & Gallagher, J. J. (1987). The role of target students in the
science classroom. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 24(1), 61–75.
Jones, K., Evans, C., Byrd, R., Campbell, K. (2000) Gender equity training and teaching
behavior. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 27 (3), 173-178.
Kahle, J. B. (2004). Will girls be left behind? Gender differences and
accountability. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 41(10), 961–969.
Klein, S. (1985) Handbook for Achieving Sex Equity Through Education. Baltimore, MD:
The Johns Hopkins University Press.
Marshall, C.S. & Reihartz, J. (1997) Gender issues in the classroom. Clearinghouse, 70 (6),
333-338.
Renold, R. (2006). Gendered classroom experiences. In C. Skelton, B. Francis, & L.
Smulyan (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Gender and Education (pp. 439–452).
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

UNIT III
GENDER AND SOCIETY

3.1. Introduction
3.2. Objectives
3.3. History and Current Scenario of Indian Women
3.3.1. Concept of Patriarchy and Matriarchy
3.3.2. Issues related to Indian Women
3.3.3. Gender roles in society through a variety of institutions
 Family
 Caste
 Religion
 Culture
 Media and popular culture (films, advertisements, etc)
 Law and State
3.4. Issue related to women/girl child
3.4.1. Female foeticide and infanticide
3.4.2. Sex Ratio
3.4.3. Sexual Harassment of women at the workplace
3.4.4. Honour Killing
3.4.5. Dowry
3.4.6. Child Marriage
3.4.7. Property Rights
3.4.8. Divorce
3.4.9. Widowhood
3.4.10. Identification of Sexual abuse/violence and its verbalization

SUGGESTED READINGS
Belle, D. (1982). Ed. Lives in Stress: Women and Depression. New Delhi: Sage.
Distributors.
Dube, L. (2001). Anthropological explorations in gender: Intersecting fields. New Delhi:
Sage Publications Pvt. Limited.
Kapur, P. (1974). Changing: tutus of the Working Women in India. Delhi: Vikas Publishing
House.
Khan, M. S. (1996). Status of women in Islam. New Delhi: APH Publishing.
Majumdar, M. (2004). Social status of women in India. New Delhi: Dominant Publishers.
Sarkar Aanchal, 2006, Gender and Development,Pragun Publication, New Delhi. Print.
Sharma, A. (2002). Women in Indian religions. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

UNIT IV
GENDER AND LAW
Structure
4.1. Introduction
4.2. Objectives
4.3. Introduction to laws related to women
4.3.1. Laws related to Rape
4.3.2. Laws related to Dowry
4.3.3. Laws related to Remarriage
4.3.4. Laws related to Divorce
4.3.5. Laws related to Property inheritance
4.3.6. Laws related to Trafficking
4.4. Indian Constitutions - Introduction
4.4.1. Women’s Reservation Bill - History and Current Status
4.4.2. The Indian constitution and provisions according to women
4.4.3. Human Rights and Women’s Right
4.5. Legal aspects related to Women
4.5.1. Declining sex ratio
4.5.2. PNDT (Pre Natal Diagnostic Techniques) Act
4.5.3. Female Feticide
4.5.4. Violence against Women
4.5.5. Domestic Violence Act
4.5.6. Sexual Harassment at Work Place
4.5.7. Indecent Representation of Women (Prohibition Act)
4.5.8. Cybercrime

SUGGESTED READINGS
Chatterjee, J., & McCarrey, M. (1991). Sex‐role Attitudes, Values and
Instrumental‐expressive Traits of Women Trainees in Traditional vs Non‐traditional
Programs. Applied Psychology, 40(3), 281-297.
Gupta, Arun K., and K. Chander Zadoo (1999): 'Development of Women: Psychological
Barriers', in Association of Indian Universities (ed), Education and Women's
Empowerment, AIU, New Delhi.
Misra, Santosh Kumar (1999): 'Empowerment of Women through Extension Education's
Association of Indian Universities (ed): Education and Women's Empowerment,
AIU, New Delhi

UNIT V
CONCEPT OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

5.1. Introduction
5.2. Objectives
5.3. Inclusive Education
5.3.1. Concept
5.3.2. Meaning,
5.3.3. Definition
5.3.4. Importance
5.3.5. Factors affecting Inclusion
5.3.6. Need for Inclusive Education in India for children with special needs.
5.4. Inclusion
5.4.1. Impairment, Disability and Handicap
5.4.2. Special Education,
5.4.3. Integrated Education
5.4.4. Mainstreaming Education
5.4.5. Mainstreaming vs Inclusion

SUGGESTED READING
Alur, M. (2001). Inclusion in the Indian Context. Humanscape, 8(6), 1-8.
Azad, Y. A. (1996). Integration of disabled in common schools: A survey-study of IEDC in
the country. New Delhi: National Council of Educational Research and Training.
Gargiulo, Richard M. Special Education in Contemporary Society. Florence, KY:
Wadsworth Publishing, 2005.
Jangira, N. K. (1995). Rethinking teacher education. Prospects, 25(2), 261-272.
Karna, G. N. (1999). United Nations and rights of disabled persons: A study in Indian
perspective. New Delhi: A.P.H. Publishing Corporation.
Kaufman, James, et al. Exceptional Learners: Introduction to Special Education. New
York: Allyn & Bacon, 2005.
NCERT. (1987). Project Integrated Education for the Disabled (PIED). New Delhi:
National Council of Educational Research and Training.
Rehabilitation Council of India. (1996). Report on Manpower Development. New Delhi:
Ministry of Welfare, Govt. of India.
Sharma, K. (1992). Integrating children with special needs. Agra: National psychological
Corporation.
Sharma, U., & Desai, I. (2002). Measuring concerns about integrated education in
India. Asia and Pacific Journal on Disability, 5(1), 2-14.
UNESCO. Salamanca Statement, 1994. Retrieved November 17, 2004, from United
Nations Educational, Scientific, Cultural Organization.
Website: http://portal.unesco.org/education/en
World Health Organization (1980). International classification of impairments, disabilities,
and handicaps. Geneva: WHO.

UNIT VI
TYPES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

6.1. Introduction
6.2. Objectives
6.3. Children with Physical challenges
Visual, Hearing, Loco-motor and Neurological
6.4. Children with Intellectual challenges
Gifted, Mentally Challenged, Autism & Learning Difficulties
6.5. Children with Emotional and Behavioral deviations
ADHD and Juvenile Delinquency;
6.6. Children with Socio-cultural deviations
SC, ST, Minorities and Linguistic Minorities.

SUGGESTED READING
Critchley, M. (1970). The dyslexic child. London: Heinemann.
Gargiulo, Richard M. Special Education in Contemporary Society. Florence, KY:
Wadsworth Publishing, 2005.
Jangira, N. K. (1995). Rethinking teacher education. Prospects, 25(2), 261-272.
Karna, G. N. (1999). United Nations and rights of disabled persons: A study in Indian
perspective. New Delhi: A.P.H. Publishing Corporation.
Mastropieri, M. A., & Scruggs, T. E. (2004). The inclusive classroom: Strategies for
effective instruction. NY: Pearson.
NCERT. (1987). Project Integrated Education for the Disabled (PIED). New Delhi:
National Council of Educational Research and Training.
Rehabilitation Council of India. (1996). Report on Manpower Development. New Delhi:
Ministry of Welfare, Govt. of India.
Sharma, K. (1992). Integrating children with special needs. Agra: National psychological
Corporation.
Sharma, U., & Desai, I. (2002). Measuring concerns about integrated education in
India. Asia and Pacific Journal on Disability, 5(1), 2-14.

UNIT VII
INCLUSION IN OPERATION

7.1. Introduction
7.2. Objectives
7.3. Inclusive Education vs Special Education
7.3.1. Parameters of Inclusive Education
7.3.2. Challenges of Inclusive Education
7.3.3. Issues in Special Education and Inclusive Education
7.3.4. Special school versus integrated school, Inclusive School
7.3.5. Characteristics of Inclusive School.
7.4. Early detection of disability
7.4.1. Parental attitude,
7.4.2. Community awareness;
7.4.3. Rehabilitation of disabilities,
7.5. Inclusive Education in the context of EFA
7.5.1. Models of Inclusive Education
7.5.2. Role of the parent, community, peers, resource person, itinerant
teacher, shadow teacher, headmaster and teacher.
7.5.3. Sustainable Practice;

SUGGESTED READING
Critchley, M. (1970). The dyslexic child. London: Heinemann.
Gargiulo, Richard M. Special Education in Contemporary Society. Florence, KY:
Wadsworth Publishing, 2005.
Jangira, N. K. (1995). Rethinking teacher education. Prospects, 25(2), 261-272.
Karna, G. N. (1999). United Nations and rights of disabled persons: A study in Indian
perspective. New Delhi: A.P.H. Publishing Corporation.
Mastropieri, M. A., & Scruggs, T. E. (2004). The inclusive classroom: Strategies for
effective instruction. NY: Pearson.
NCERT. (1987). Project Integrated Education for the Disabled (PIED). New Delhi:
National Council of Educational Research and Training.
Rao Indumathi, (2001). Understanding inclusive education from heart, EENET newsletters
and web publication
Rao Indumathi, (2002). Country status on inclusive education/special needs documentation
good practices, UNICEF, Regional Office
Rehabilitation Council of India. (1996). Report on Manpower Development. New Delhi:
Ministry of Welfare, Govt. of India.
Sharma, U., & Desai, I. (2002). Measuring concerns about integrated education in
India. Asia and Pacific Journal on Disability, 5(1), 2-14.
The Salamanca Statement and Framework for Action on Special Needs Education. World
Conference on Special Needs Education: Access and Quality, Salamanca, Spain, 7-
10 June 1994. UNESCO and Ministry of Education and Science, Spain 1994.
WCEFA. (1990) World Declaration on Education for All, Inter-Agency Commission for the
World Conference on Education for All, 1990.

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